FOF #2100 – Tinder is the Night

Jan 15, 2015 · 85570 views

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Is being an owner of a lonely heart much better than being an owner of a broken heart? Either way, breaking up is hard to do, even if you’re just breaking up with a friend.

Today comedian Cody Melcher talks about his romantic woes after breaking up with his long distance boyfriend over the holidays.

    Comments

  1. agrimi01 says:

    Good show! I have to say that I totally agree with what you guys said about removing extremely negative people from your life. I’ve personally spent a lot of time trying to be a good friend to some who can’t see the forest through the trees. I would try to provide advice and friendship, but the toxicity continued. Eventually, you do need to separate yourself from the situation. It’s better for you in the long run.

    Hope you have a great holiday weekend! Love you!

    Jim

  2. Than says:

    Art doesn’t have to say anything to or about society. Art is just personal expression, and it may or may not influence others. I paint. I paint for myself. I really don’t care if anyone else sees it or likes it. It’s art, but it’s personal art, not public art.

    • Cody Melcher says:

      I didn’t mean to say art “inherently” must do or say something. And I didn’t even say it needed to say anything. I was speaking about public art. Art that is put out for public consumption from an artist.

    • Cody Melcher says:

      Art’s fun because, legitimately, it doesn’t have a REAL definition. I firmly believe that every person’s interpretation of art is valid, and it’s super neat to talk about those differences and find the fluidity in what is, ultimately, human expression.

      • Than says:

        I think the best definition of art is the simplest; art is any form of personal expression. That’s a very broad definition. So, even the homeless man shouting on the subway platform is giving us a bit of performance art. I accept most won’t consider that art, but I think any other definition is just too limiting. There’s no question in my mind that video games are art.

        I love that art can be rorschach, but I do think it matters what the art means to the person who created it, what the artist’s intentions were.

  3. Cody is like a delicate little puppydog who just wants to be loved. I didn’t realize he was the same age as me, he looks much older, getting closer to 30 when you feel like you still haven’t gotten your life n’shit together isn’t the best feeling, I’ve been there, still kinda there, but I hope things work out for Cody.

    When Cody talked about the art vs. critique argument, and mentioned video games, the only thing I could think of when he said that it’s not fair to shut down any criticism, were the feminist/social justice critics who often criticize(very poorly most of the times) video games for being sexist, which results in lots of backlash from others who don’t think video games should be critiqued like a piece of art, but a lot of those video games are made by a major video game company, with hundreds of people who worked on it, not just one single artist, so I dunno if that is what he meant, although, it seems like the only time people want to call something like video games art, is so that they can critique it like it’s a piece of art to give justification for their shitty arguments against it *cough*

    I’ve been through art college, in that kind of environment, who NEED critique to be a better artists, otherwise you are just wasting your time and money being there. Once you are in the outside world and are putting your art out there, I think it’s fair game for anyone to critique your art, but if you don’t want it, then don’t listen. Unless of course your are committing a crime or abuse in the name of art, then that’s not right and you prolly deserve to be heavily criticized. For example, there is/was a sculpture artist who made these sculptures that are inside some of the New York subways, but in his early artist days he shot a dog dead as an art piece, which he never was able to live down and deeply regretted doing it.

    • Cody Melcher says:

      First of all, I hope things work out for you, too! Life is rough, but we’re all running along as best we can!

      My point about video games is that I’ve seen developers and players demand that video games be considered art in the same realm that film is (which I would argue, to your point, ALSO has tons of people working on it, but is still considered an art and critiqued as such). Animation is VERY similar to video games, but we still look at Pixar movies as art. And, my point was in mentioning them, that I’ve seen the same people demand that video games be given the same consideration as film, but will then balk at the concept of feminism or representation being brought up in the same manner they are in film. That’s pretty much it.

      I don’t have a strong opinion on whether video games should be considered art. I think that some are treated as art by the makers and some are not in the same way that some films are purely for entertainment and some are not. I, however, will still fight for representation in media, regardless of whether it’s art or not, because it’s important to me.

      And, I agree. As I said, it’s not that I don’t think you have to listen, but you also shouldn’t shut down criticism or conversation about your work. Especially if you want it considered at a level in which criticism and conversation is inherent.

      Hope that clarified why I made that comment. Maybe?

      • I guess because I mostly play Nintendo and Japanese role playing games, the video games as art argument is lost on me. I have played a few games that I could have considered a work of art based on their visuals and how they were crafted, but I think most of these big gaming companies who put out their AAA games just want to make a profit from them and prolly don’t regard them as art.

        Plus, the current video game community online has become so toxic, what with Anita Sarkeesan and her Tropes vs. women series (which is utter garbage in my opinion), yet because of all the misogynistic trolls whose voices are the loudest, any constrictive criticism of her gets overshadowed by them, then there was all that mess with Zoe Quinn, the Gamergate situation that I think is still going on? Now EVERYONE has to get their opinion in, so I keep out of it, I got into it for a little while after watching Anita’s first tropes vs. women video, where she made very poor arguments against my childhood favorite Nintendo games, but after a while it became so damn exhausting, and at this point I just want to have fun and play some video games without having a social statement be made about it. If people are wanting to regard video games as art, whatever, that’s cool I guess, but at least make your criticism against them constructive, have some sense of meaning and purpose, which I rarely ever see these days…especially in the online/social media environment like twitter, or tumblr, prolly some of the worst places on the internet for constructive arguments.

  4. Brenxdan says:

    Cody is looking SO HANDSOME in his new threads! <3

  5. Christpher says:

    Great show! I’ve ended two friendships in the past three years because of the negativity these people brought into my life. It was tough because I loved them like family and they weren’t always that way, but I just couldn’t be around it anymore.

    And on a side note – Cody you are adorable, and if I lived in Chicago I would date you.

  6. RandyStrokes says:

    Hey thanks for posting that video from 2011. I am fairly certain one of my friends is in it for 2 full seconds!! Why am I so excited, she passed extremely suddenly from bleeding on the brain over the summer. It was AWESOME to see her smiling nod.

    Thank you!!

  7. Good show! Corey Melcher is a great guest.

  8. CODY! Sorry for the mixup!!!!

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